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pbsthisdayinhistory:

August 7, 1912: Theodore Roosevelt nominated as Bull Moose candidate
On this day in 1912, two-term President Theodore Roosevelt was re-nominated for the presidency by the Progressive Party (also known as the Bull Moose Party), a group of Republicans who disliked their own party’s nominee, William Howard Taft. Roosevelt’s platform was based on increased welfare and fair business competition.
In the fall election, however, Roosevelt was defeated by Democratic candidate Woodrow Wilson, who benefited from the divided Republican Party.
Explore Teddy Roosevelt’s early political career with this preview video from Ken Burns’s The Roosevelts.
Photo: Theodore Roosevelt campaigns for the Progressive Party. (Theodore Roosevelt Collection, Houghton Library, Harvard University.)

pbsthisdayinhistory:

August 7, 1912: Theodore Roosevelt nominated as Bull Moose candidate

On this day in 1912, two-term President Theodore Roosevelt was re-nominated for the presidency by the Progressive Party (also known as the Bull Moose Party), a group of Republicans who disliked their own party’s nominee, William Howard Taft. Roosevelt’s platform was based on increased welfare and fair business competition.

In the fall election, however, Roosevelt was defeated by Democratic candidate Woodrow Wilson, who benefited from the divided Republican Party.

Explore Teddy Roosevelt’s early political career with this preview video from Ken Burns’s The Roosevelts.

Photo: Theodore Roosevelt campaigns for the Progressive Party. (Theodore Roosevelt Collection, Houghton Library, Harvard University.)

pbsthisdayinhistory:

September 5, 1905: Theodore Roosevelt Negotiates a Peaceful Settlement of the Russo-Japanese War
On this day in 1905, peace delegates in New Hampshire signed the Treaty of Portsmouth which officially ended the Russo-Japanese War, a conflict over control of Manchuria and Korea. The Japanese emerged victorious as the first non-Western world power.  Theodore Roosevelt, who helped mediate the treaty negotiations, later won the Nobel Peace Prize for his achievement.  
Watch real footage of Theodore Roosevelt receiving the Nobel Peace Prize with this preview from Ken Burns’s The Roosevelts.
Photo: Russian and Japanese peace delegates with Teddy Roosevelt in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1905. Theodore Roosevelt Collection, Houghton Library, Harvard University

pbsthisdayinhistory:

September 5, 1905: Theodore Roosevelt Negotiates a Peaceful Settlement of the Russo-Japanese War

On this day in 1905, peace delegates in New Hampshire signed the Treaty of Portsmouth which officially ended the Russo-Japanese War, a conflict over control of Manchuria and Korea. The Japanese emerged victorious as the first non-Western world power.  Theodore Roosevelt, who helped mediate the treaty negotiations, later won the Nobel Peace Prize for his achievement. 

Watch real footage of Theodore Roosevelt receiving the Nobel Peace Prize with this preview from Ken Burns’s The Roosevelts.

Photo: Russian and Japanese peace delegates with Teddy Roosevelt in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1905. Theodore Roosevelt Collection, Houghton Library, Harvard University

philamuseum:

Throwback Thursday: “That’s not art,” declared former President Theodore Roosevelt.In 1913, “The International Exhibition of Modern Art” opened at New York City’s 69th Regiment Armory. Including over 1,300 works of art by over 300 international artists, the exhibition was the first introduction to avant-garde art for many Americans. The show was met with cheers, jeers, guffaws, and even accusations of insanity. The Philadelphia Museum of Art is the proud home of many of these once outrageous works of art, though there is still the occasional echo of Theo’s lament 101 years later."The Armory Show," as it is called today, was revived in 1994, and the now annual exhibition opens today in New York City.”Nude Descending a Staircase (No. 2),” 1912, Marcel Duchamp, © Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris / Estate of Marcel Duchamp

philamuseum:

Throwback Thursday: “That’s not art,” declared former President Theodore Roosevelt.

In 1913, “The International Exhibition of Modern Art” opened at New York City’s 69th Regiment Armory. Including over 1,300 works of art by over 300 international artists, the exhibition was the first introduction to avant-garde art for many Americans. The show was met with cheers, jeers, guffaws, and even accusations of insanity. The Philadelphia Museum of Art is the proud home of many of these once outrageous works of art, though there is still the occasional echo of Theo’s lament 101 years later.

"The Armory Show," as it is called today, was revived in 1994, and the now annual exhibition opens today in New York City.

Nude Descending a Staircase (No. 2),” 1912, Marcel Duchamp, © Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris / Estate of Marcel Duchamp

pbsthisdayinhistory:

September 14, 1901: Theodore Roosevelt is Sworn in as President After William McKinley is Assassinated
On this day in 1901, Vice President Theodore Roosevelt took the oath of office as President of the United States upon William McKinley’s assassination.  Roosevelt was 42 at the time, making him the youngest President.
McKinley, who had been extremely resistant to accepting security measures, was shot by anarchist Leon Czolgosz about a week earlier in Buffalo, New York.  Afterwards, Congress assigned the Secret Service the duty of protecting the President. 
Explore the significance of this event with a preview video of McKinley’s assassination from Ken Burns’s The Roosevelts.
Photo: Assassination of President McKinley. Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division

pbsthisdayinhistory:

September 14, 1901: Theodore Roosevelt is Sworn in as President After William McKinley is Assassinated

On this day in 1901, Vice President Theodore Roosevelt took the oath of office as President of the United States upon William McKinley’s assassination.  Roosevelt was 42 at the time, making him the youngest President.

McKinley, who had been extremely resistant to accepting security measures, was shot by anarchist Leon Czolgosz about a week earlier in Buffalo, New York.  Afterwards, Congress assigned the Secret Service the duty of protecting the President.

Explore the significance of this event with a preview video of McKinley’s assassination from Ken Burns’s The Roosevelts.

Photo: Assassination of President McKinley. Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division

houghtonlib:

Tonight PBS airs the second part of Ken Burns’ new documentary The Roosevelts: An Intimate History. The film spans the century between Theodore Roosevelt’s birth in 1858 and Eleanor Roosevelt’s death in 1962, and its first three episodes feature a number of images from Houghton’s Theodore Roosevelt Collection.
Theodore Roosevelt standing on Glacier Point in Yosemite, 1903.
560.51 1903-117
Houghton Library, Harvard University

houghtonlib:

Tonight PBS airs the second part of Ken Burns’ new documentary The Roosevelts: An Intimate History. The film spans the century between Theodore Roosevelt’s birth in 1858 and Eleanor Roosevelt’s death in 1962, and its first three episodes feature a number of images from Houghton’s Theodore Roosevelt Collection.

Theodore Roosevelt standing on Glacier Point in Yosemite, 1903.

560.51 1903-117

Houghton Library, Harvard University